Question: What Problems Did Migrant Workers Face During The Great Depression?

What are the problems faced by migrant workers?

Many of them do not have the required paperwork to stay in the country legally, so they face the constant threat of deportation.Coercion.

Lack of Benefits.

Dangerous Conditions.

Cultural Differences.

Educational Issues..

Why did Californians hate Okies?

Because they arrived impoverished and because wages were low, many lived in filth and squalor in tents and shantytowns along the irrigation ditches. Consequently, they were despised as “Okies,” a term of disdain, even hate, pinned on economically degraded farm laborers no matter their state of origin.

What happened to Okies?

Many years ago, the weather in Oklahoma went haywire, the rain stopped, dust storms blew away the top soil, crops failed, farmers couldn’t pay their mortgages, and Okies fled to the promised land of California in a migration that has been compared to the biblical story of Exodus.

What was life like for migrant workers in 1930s?

The working hours were long, and many children worked in the fields with their parents. Working conditions were often unsafe and unsanitary. Migrant workers had to follow the harvest of different crops, so they had to continue to pack up and move throughout California to find work.

Who were the Okies and what challenges did they face during the Great Depression?

“Okies,” as Californians labeled them, were refugee farm families from the Southern Plains who migrated to California in the 1930s to escape the ruin of the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl.

What hardships did immigrants face during the Depression?

Along with the job crisis and food shortages that affected all U.S. workers, Mexicans and Mexican Americans had to face an additional threat: deportation. As unemployment swept the U.S., hostility to immigrant workers grew, and the government began a program of repatriating immigrants to Mexico.

What were typical salaries for migrant workers in the 1930s?

As a result, wages throughout the nation fell during the Depression. Migrant workers in California who had been making 35 cents per hour in 1928 made only 14 cents per hour in 1933. Sugar beet workers in Colorado saw their wages decrease from $27 an acre in 1930 to $12.37 an acre three years later.

Why were the Californians hostile toward the Okies?

The California hype attracted these Okies to the area. During the middle period, or 1930s, the Okie were desperately poor. These migrants did not leave their homes because of California hype. Instead, they were forced to leave their homes due to desperate conditions.

What were migrant workers during the Great Depression?

The Great Depression and the Dust Bowl, a period of drought that destroyed millions of acres of farmland, forces white farmers to sell their farms and become migrant workers who travel from farm to farm to pick fruit and other crops at starvation wages.

Where were migrant workers moving to during the Great Depression?

Many families left farm fields to move to Los Angeles or the San Francisco Bay area, where they found work in shipyards and aircraft factories that were gearing up to supply the war effort. By 1950, only about 25 percent of the original Dust Bowl migrants were still working the fields.

What challenges did immigrants face?

“Many of these immigrants and refugees have endured significant hardships in their native countries, including poverty, war trauma, persecution and rape,” says clinical psychologist Dennis Hunt. “But few may have anticipated the stress on their families that was waiting for them in the United States.”

What were some of the struggles that migrant workers faced?

Migrant workers were subjected to harsher working conditions and lower wages because people were desperate for work. Workers were replaceable. Too many people looking for work reduced living conditions. The migrant worker camps were primitive – no electricity and no indoor plumbing.